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  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 2015

    Figure 3: Meta-analysis of All 17 Qualifying Studies: Any Breastfeeding for 6 Months and Beyond Compared With Shorter Duration

    OSCC indicates Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers; UAE, United Arab Emirates; UK, United Kingdom; UKCCS, UK Childhood Cancer Study; US, United States.
  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 2015

    Figure 4: Meta-analysis of Studies Including Only Children Diagnosed as Having Cancer at Age 1 Year or Older

    OSCC indicates Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers; UK, United Kingdom; UKCCS, UK Childhood Cancer Study; US, United States.
  • JAMA Pediatrics April 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Distribution of Actual Median Oxygen Saturation

    Distribution in the low oxygen saturation (SpO2) (85%-89%) and high SpO2 (91%-95%) arms in the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial (SUPPORT), the Canadian Oxygen Trial (COT), and the Benefits of Oxygen Saturation Targeting II (BOOST II) trials. The mortality numbers currently available are shown as percentages (note that the 18- to 22-month mortality numbers are currently not available for the BOOST II UK and Australia trials). Because the SUPPORT and the original algorithm BOOST II data are reported using the original algorithm, corresponding SpO2 numbers on the revised algorithm are shown as well. A saturation of 90% in the original algorithm corresponds to a saturation of 88% on the revised algorithm. This figure was adapted from Figure 4 in Lakshminrusimha et al.
  • Costs of Autism Spectrum Disorders in the United Kingdom and the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(8):721-728. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.210

    Buescher and coauthors update cost estimates associated with autism spectrum disorders. See also the editorial by Shattuck and Roux.

  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 2012

    Figure: Gestational Ageism

    Figure 1. A schematic representation of recent guidelines relating resuscitation decisions to gestational age in extremely premature infants. AAP indicates American Academy of Pediatrics; AHA, American Heart Association; BAPM, British Association of Perinatal Medicine; DPA, Dutch Pediatric Association; ERC, European Resuscitation Council; and UK, United Kingdom.
  • Hold Those Scalpels

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008; 162(7):698-698. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.162.7.698-a
  • Subspecialty Care Use Rates: Reverse Causation and Generalizability Issues

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003; 157(10):1032-1033. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.157.10.1032-a
  • Primary Care and Specialty Care for US Children: What Is the Right Mix?

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003; 157(3):219-220. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.157.3.219
  • Referral of Children to Specialists in the United States and the United Kingdom

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003; 157(3):279-285. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.157.3.279
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2002

    Figure 1: Starting Dose of Levothyroxine for the Treatment of Congenital Hypothyroidism: A Systematic Review

    Mean developmental score for cohorts at every age of assessment. Cohorts are ranked according to mean starting dose of levothyroxine. UK indicates United Kingdom.
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2002

    Figure 2: Starting Dose of Levothyroxine for the Treatment of Congenital Hypothyroidism: A Systematic Review

    Mean developmental score for cohorts at youngest age of assessment. Cohorts are ranked according to mean starting dose of levothyroxine. UK indicates United Kingdom.
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 5, 2017

    Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier Curve of Renal Survival in 898 Children With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) by Soluble Urokinase Receptor (suPAR) Quartile

    Five-year renal survival probability in children with CKD is plotted according to suPAR quartile. Q1 indicates a suPAR level less than 4.610 pg/mL; Q2, 4.610-5.658 pg/mL; Q3, 5.658-7.053; Q4, greater than 7.053. Q1 is the lowest quartile and Q4 is the highest quartile.
  • Association of Serum Soluble Urokinase Receptor Levels With Progression of Kidney Disease in Children

    Abstract Full Text
    online only
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(11):e172914. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.2914

    This cohort study examines whether elevated serum soluble urokinase receptor levels are associated with renal disease progression in children with chronic kidney disease.

  • Successful Urokinase Therapy for Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in a Premature Infant

    Abstract Full Text
    Am J Dis Child. 1988; 142(12):1267-1268. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1988.02150120021018
  • Failure of Thrombolytic Therapy in Four Children With Extensive Thromboses

    Abstract Full Text
    Am J Dis Child. 1992; 146(2):187-193. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1992.02160140053020
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 5, 2017

    Figure 2: Forest Plot for the Progression of Renal Failure

    The risk attributable to high vs low soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) levels in individual population subgroups were plotted. Each model was adjusted for all other covariates (including baseline estimated glomerular filtration rates [eGFR], age, systolic blood pressure, sex, proteinuria, and diagnosis). The P value for interaction between high vs low suPAR level and the respective covariate is given. Median split for suPAR level, 5.658 pg/mL. CAKUT indicates congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract; HR, hazard ratio.
  • Evaluation of Survivors of Respiratory Distress Syndrome at 4 Years of Age

    Abstract Full Text
    Am J Dis Child. 1970; 120(4):296-302. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1970.02100090070003
  • Influenza Coinfection and Outcomes in Children With Complicated Pneumonia

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011; 165(6):506-512. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.295
    Objective

    To determine the impact of influenza coinfection on outcomes for children with complicated pneumonia.

    Design

    Retrospective cohort study.

    Setting

    Forty children's hospitals that contribute data to the Pediatric Health Information System.

    Participants

    Children discharged from participating hospitals between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2009, with complicated pneumonia requiring a pleural drainage procedure.

    Main Exposure

    Influenza coinfection.

    Main Outcome Measures

    Intensive care unit admission, receipt of mechanical ventilation, receipt of vasoactive infusions, receipt of blood product transfusions, in-hospital death, readmission within 14 days of hospital discharge, hospital length of stay, and cost of hospitalization.

    Results

    Overall, 3382 of 9680 children with complicated pneumonia underwent pleural fluid drainage; 105 patients (3.1%) undergoing pleural drainage had influenza coinfection. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 1201 cases (35.5%); the most commonly identified bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus in children with influenza coinfection (22.9% of cases) and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children without coinfection (20.0% of cases). In multivariable analysis, influenza coinfection was associated with higher odds of intensive care unit admission and receipt of mechanical ventilation, vasoactive infusions, and blood product transfusions as well as higher costs and a longer hospital stay. Children with influenza coinfection were less likely to require readmission, although there was a trend toward higher odds of mortality for patients with coinfection. In a subanalysis stratified by bacteria, outcomes remained worse for coinfected children in the subgroups of children with S aureus and with no specified bacteria.

    Conclusions

    Influenza coinfection occurred in 3.1% of children with complicated pneumonia. Clinical outcomes for children with complicated pneumonia and influenza coinfection were more severe than for children without documented influenza coinfection.

  • Video-Assisted Thorascopic Surgery vs Chest Drain With Fibrinolytics for the Treatment of Pleural Empyema in Children: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010; 164(2):201-203. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.271