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  • Association Between Initial Use of e-Cigarettes and Subsequent Cigarette Smoking Among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(8):788-797. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1488

    This systematic review and meta-analysis assesses initial use of e-cigarettes and subsequent cigarette smoking among adolescents and young adults.

  • Online Electronic Cigarette Marketing—Violation of Self-regulated Standards by Tobacco Companies

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(5):511-512. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.4501

    This research letter discusses the marketing practices of electronic cigarette companies and the age-verification gates used on their websites to prevent those younger than 18 years from accessing their website.

  • Associations Between Initial Water Pipe Tobacco Smoking and Snus Use and Subsequent Cigarette Smoking: Results From a Longitudinal Study of US Adolescents and Young Adults

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(2):129-136. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.2697

    This 2-wave national longitudinal study finds that baseline water pipe tobacco smoking and the use of snus independently predicted the onset of cigarette smoking and current cigarette smoking at follow-up.

  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2015

    Figure: Predicted Probabilities of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Current Cigarette Smoking at Follow-up, and High-Intensity Cigarette Smoking at Follow-up

    Increases in the probabilities of use are shown for water pipe tobacco smoking (WTS) and snus use. The age group is set at 18 to 20 years, sex at male, race/ethnicity at non-Hispanic white, sensation-seeking quartile at 2, friends’ smoking status at yes, parental smoking status at current, maternal educational level at at least some college, and annual parental household income at $50 000 to less than $100 000. The closed circle represents the point estimate of the increase in probability, and the limit lines represent the 95% CI.
  • Associations of Tobacco Control Policies With Birth Outcomes

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(11):e142365. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.2365

    This study reports that increases in the cigarette tax contribute to improving health outcomes related to smoking among the highest risk mothers and infants. Considering that US states increase cigarette taxes for reasons other than to improve birth outcomes, these findings are welcome by-products of state policies.

  • Tobacco Control Policy and Electronic Cigarettes

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(7):601-602. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.349
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2014

    Figure: Electronic Cigarette Use and Conventional Cigarette Smoking in 2011 and 2012

    Current e-cigarette use in 2011 (A) and 2012 (B) was associated (P = .003 in 2011; P = .001 in 2012) with heavier smoking among conventional smokers (≥100 cigarettes in lifetime, having smoked in past 30 days). Participants were a representative sample of US middle and high school students who responded to the National Youth Tobacco Survey. Current e-cigarette users had used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days. Former e-cigarette users had tried e-cigarettes but had not used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days. Never e-cigarette users had never tried an e-cigarette. The numbers of conventional cigarettes smoked per day are on the days cigarettes were smoked during the past 30 days.
  • Trends in Tobacco and Alcohol Brand Placements in Popular US Movies, 1996 Through 2009

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(7):634-639. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.393

    Bergamini et al examined recent trends for tobacco and alcohol use in the top 100 box-office hits released in the United States from 1996 through 2009.

  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2013

    Figure 1: Trend in Tobacco Brand Appearances

    Trend in tobacco brand appearances in the top 100 movies with the highest US box-office gross revenues from 1996 through 2009. Points show the actual data, and the bold line shows the post-1999 trend estimate. Rate of decline is 7.0% per year.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2013

    Figure 2: Trends in Tobacco Screen Time

    Trends in tobacco screen time (in minutes) for the top 100 movies with the highest US box-office gross revenues from 1996 through 2009 by whether they were youth or adult rated.
  • JAMA Pediatrics April 1, 2013

    Figure: Regional Brain Morphometry and Impulsivity in Adolescents Following Prenatal Exposure to Cocaine and Tobacco

    Figure 3. Relationship between thalamic volume and Sensation Seeking Scale for Children (SSSC) score based on prenatal tobacco exposure (PTE). Brain/behavior association is shown as a solid line for PTE subjects (in solid triangles, P = .04) and a dotted line for non-PTE subjects (open circles).
  • Regional Brain Morphometry and Impulsivity in Adolescents Following Prenatal Exposure to Cocaine and Tobacco

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(4):348-354. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.550
    Liu and colleagues examined the brain morphologic features and associated impulsive behaviors in adolescents following prenatal exposure to cocaine and/or tobacco. Nora D. Volkow, MD, provides a related editorial.
  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Influence on Substance Use in Adolescent Social Networks

    Figure 1. Illustrative network maps of a school in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 304). Each node represents an adolescent and each arrow between them, a friendship nomination. Node color indicates substance use behavior, yellow for drinking alcohol (A), gray for smoking tobacco (B), red for smoking marijuana (C), and orange for binge drinking (D). Green nodes indicate adolescents who do not engage in the substance abuse behavior shown in that panel. Circle nodes are adolescents with an authoritative parent, and square nodes are those with some other type (neglectful, authoritarian, or permissive). The size of each node is proportional to the number of friends' parents who are authoritative. This Figure shows that behavior tends to cluster in the social network, and adolescents who do not engage in substance abuse are often connected to authoritative parents via their friends, even if their own parents are not authoritative (indicated by large green squares).
  • Determination of Tobacco Smoke Exposure by Plasma Cotinine Levels in Infants and Children Attending Urban Public Hospital Clinics

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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(9):851-856. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.170
    Using a convenience sample, Dempsey and coauthors determine the prevalence of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among infants and young children who received preventive care at pediatric preventative care clinics associated with an urban public hospital. An editorial suggests that this study heralds a paradigm shift in addressing family tobacco use and SHS exposure for children.
  • Toward a Population Free of Tobacco Smoke Exposure: Testing of Children in the Pediatric Setting

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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(9):871-872. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.297
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Smoking and the Risk of Middle Ear Disease in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Figure 3. Relationship between secondhand tobacco smoke exposure by maternal smoking after birth and the risk of middle ear disease using a meta-analysis of comparative epidemiologic studies. Data are presented as odds ratios (ORs) subgrouped by the definition of middle ear disease outcome. Each small square denotes the OR for a single study, with horizontal lines denoting 95% CIs. The center of each diamond denotes the pooled OR and the corners the 95% CIs. An OR greater than 1 indicates a higher risk of the outcome in those exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke.
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Smoking and the Risk of Middle Ear Disease in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Figure 4. Relationship between paternal secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and the risk of middle ear disease using a meta-analysis of comparative epidemiologic studies. Data are presented as odds ratios (ORs) subgrouped by the definition of middle ear disease outcome. Each small square denotes the OR for a single study, with horizontal lines denoting 95% CIs. The center of each diamond denotes the pooled OR and the corners the 95% CIs. An OR greater than 1 indicates a higher risk of the outcome in those exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke.
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Smoking and the Risk of Middle Ear Disease in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Figure 5. Relationship between secondhand tobacco smoke exposure by any household member and the risk of middle ear disease using a meta-analysis of comparative epidemiologic studies. Data are presented as odds ratios (ORs) subgrouped by the definition of middle ear disease outcome. Each square denotes the OR for a single study, with horizontal lines denoting 95% CIs. The center of each diamond denotes the pooled OR and the corners the 95% CIs. An OR greater than1 indicates a higher risk of the outcome in those exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke). AOM indicates acute otitis media; ROM, recurrent otitis media.
  • Depictions of Tobacco Use in 2007 Broadcast Television Programming Popular Among US Youth

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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011; 165(2):147-151. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.276
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 2, 2009

    Figure 1: Maternal Intimate Partner Violence and Increased Asthma Incidence in Children: Buffering Effects of Supportive Caregiving

    Risk of child asthma by maternal intimate partner violence stratified by mother-child activities. Models were adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal education, economic hardship, tobacco exposure, and low birth weight. Error bars show 95% confidence interval.