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  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2013

    Figure: Inpatient Growth and Resource Use in 28 Children's Hospitals: A Longitudinal, Multi-institutional Study

    Figure 1. Patient and resource use growth trends of patients with and without chronic conditions in 28 children's hospitals. This figure presents the cumulative percent growth of the number of individual patients, hospitalizations, bed days, and charges in reference to 2004. The P value indicates the difference in the slope of the trend for the 2 groups of patients, adjusted for confounders in a generalized estimation equation.
  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2013

    Figure: Inpatient Growth and Resource Use in 28 Children's Hospitals: A Longitudinal, Multi-institutional Study

    Figure 2. Patient and resource use growth trends of patients in the chronic condition cohort groupings in 28 children's hospitals. This figure presents the cumulative percent growth of the number of individual patients, hospitalizations, bed days, and charges in reference to 2004. The P value indicates the difference in the slope of the trend for children with chronic conditions in 2 or more body systems compared with children who did not have a chronic condition, adjusted for confounders in a generalized estimation equation.
  • JAMA Pediatrics November 1, 2012

    Figure: Physical Activity Intensity and Cardiometabolic Risk in Youth

    Figure 2. The association between the odds of overweight status and high normal systolic blood pressure across various intensities of physical activity. This graphic representation of the results of a series of logistic regression analyses depicts the slope of the association between the time spent being physically active at various accelerometer cutpoints (ie, physical activity intensities) and the odds of overweight status (A) and high normal systolic blood pressure (B). cpm indicates counts per minute.
  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2012

    Figure: The Impact of Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on Bullying and Peer Rejection: A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    Figure 2. The slope terms indicate that children generally experienced an increased risk for involvement in bullying and peer rejection over 4 years. A, Effect of School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) on the perpetration of bullying behaviors. B, Effect of SWPBIS on peer rejection. C, Interaction between grade cohort and SWPBIS intervention status on peer rejection.
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2011

    Figure: Patient Volume and Quality of Care for Young Children Hospitalized With Acute Gastroenteritis

    Figure 2. Change in percentage of children receiving nonrecommended care for every doubling of patient volume. Fitted values from unadjusted (lines with shaded 95% confidence intervals) and fully adjusted (points depicting mean fitted value within each decile of volume) regression models are shown. The P values evaluate whether the slope of the fully adjusted model is equal to 0.
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2010

    Figure 1: Parental Hopeful Patterns of Thinking, Emotions, and Pediatric Palliative Care Decision Making: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Parental health trajectory ratings of patients by subsequent change in limit of intervention order status. The thick black line in each graph represents the mean health rating for the group at each point. The mean slope was the mean of individual change in health rating value from the most distant rating to the rating given today divided by the number of weeks recalled and then multiplied by 52 weeks.
  • JAMA Pediatrics November 1, 2009

    Figure 1: Transcutaneous Bilirubin Nomograms: A Systematic Review of Population Differences and Analysis of Bilirubin Kinetics

    Mean transcutaneous bilirubin levels and rates of rise over time. Rate of rise over time is represented by the slope of each segment (short lines). Data were fitted using quadratic equations, and these are represented by percentile curves for each study. R2 goodness of fit is indicated in the models for each study. These percentile curves demonstrate the tendency to reach a transcutaneous bilirubin plateau at about 96 hours of life. Hispanic neonates demonstrate higher rates of rise and later plateaus (>96 hours of life). The transcutaneous bilirubin levels seem to plateau earlier in Thai neonates; their rate of rise becomes negative after 72 hours of life.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2007

    Figure 1: Effect of Regulatory Warnings on Antidepressant Prescribing for Children and Adolescents

    Monthly proportions of new users of antidepressants for all antidepressants and for specific classes of antidepressants. Solid lines indicate the predicted values from the piecewise linear regression model (which allows changes in both the intercept and slope for the trend following the Committee on Safety of Medicines [CSM] warning); individual symbols, the observed monthly proportions. Both the predicted and observed values were adjusted for seasonality. SSRI indicates selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; SNRI, selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; and FDA, Food and Drug Administration.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2007

    Figure 2: Effect of Regulatory Warnings on Antidepressant Prescribing for Children and Adolescents

    Monthly proportions of new users of antidepressants according to patient age. Analyses used the logarithm of the monthly proportions. Solid lines indicate the predicted values from the piecewise linear regression model (which allows changes in both the intercept and slope for the trend following the Committee on Safety of Medicines [CSM] warning); individual symbols, the observed monthly proportions. Both the predicted and observed values were adjusted for seasonality. FDA indicates Food and Drug Administration.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2007

    Figure 3: Effect of Regulatory Warnings on Antidepressant Prescribing for Children and Adolescents

    Monthly proportions of prevalent users of antidepressants and antidepressant discontinuations. For prevalent users, solid lines indicate the predicted values from the piecewise linear regression model (which allows changes in both the intercept and slope for the trend following the Committee on Safety of Medicines [CSM] warning); individual symbols, the observed monthly proportions. Both the predicted and observed values were adjusted for seasonality. FDA indicates Food and Drug Administration.
  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2007

    Figure: Serum Lipids and Glucose Control: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    Plots of lipid value by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentration and fitted regression lines by diabetes type. A, Total cholesterol concentration by HbA1c concentration. B, Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration by HbA1c concentration. C, High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration by HbA1c concentration. D, Triglyceride concentration by HbA1c concentration. E, Non-HDL cholesterol concentration by HbA1c concentration. Values come from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study with patients aged 10 years or older from cases in 2001 and 2002. Slope is the increase in lipid concentration in milligrams per deciliter for each 1.0 unit increase in HbA1c concentration.
  • Dismissing Families: A Slippery Slope

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006; 160(4):452-452. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.160.4.452-a
  • Computer Simulation of Stair Falls to Investigate Scenarios in Child Abuse

    Abstract Full Text
    free access has multimedia
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155(9):1008-1014. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.155.9.1008
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2001

    Figure 12: Computer Simulation of Stair Falls to Investigate Scenarios in Child Abuse

    Momentum of upper leg vs slope of stairs (rise-run).
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2001

    Figure 11: Computer Simulation of Stair Falls to Investigate Scenarios in Child Abuse

    Kinetic energy of upper leg vs slope of stairs (rise-run).
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2001

    Figure 13: Computer Simulation of Stair Falls to Investigate Scenarios in Child Abuse

    Impact velocity of upper leg vs slope of stairs (rise-run).
  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 1999

    Figure 1: Variables Influencing Penicillin Treatment Outcome in Streptococcal Tonsillopharyngitis

    Observed and predicted treatment success by the number of days ill prior to initiation of treatment. The dots indicate observed proportions, with the vertical lines showing 95% confidence intervals. The curve is the logit-fitted line, with an intercept of 0.211 and a slope of 0.436. Numbers in parentheses indicate numbers of subjects.
  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 1999

    Figure 2: Variables Influencing Penicillin Treatment Outcome in Streptococcal Tonsillopharyngitis

    Observed and predicted treatment success by patient age. The dots indicate observed proportions, with the vertical lines showing 95% confidence intervals. The confidence interval for age 15 years was calculated combining the 12 observations for patients aged 15 years and older. The curve is the logit-fitted line, with an intercept of −0.067 and a slope of 0.131. Numbers in parentheses indicate numbers of subjects.
  • Sitting at the Top of the Slope

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998; 152(6):607-608. doi:
  • Sitting at the Top of the Slope—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998; 152(6):608-608. doi: