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  • Association Between Linear Growth and Bone Accrual in a Diverse Cohort of Children and Adolescents

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(9):e171769. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.1769

    This mixed longitudinal study assesses the acquisition of whole-body and skeletal site–specific bone mineral content relative to linear growth in a healthy, diverse, longitudinal cohort of children, adolescents, and young adults and tests for differences related to sex and African American race.

  • Thoughts and Response to Authority-Perpetrated, Discriminatory, and Race-Based Violence

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(6):511-512. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0137

    This Viewpoint calls for the study of adverse health effects associated with authority-perpetrated, race-based violence.

  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Adjusted Relative Risks (RRs) of Outcomes by Gestational Age (GA) at 22 to 28 Weeks

    Models adjusted for center, year of birth, maternal age (≤19 vs ≥20 years), sex, race/ethnicity (black, white, or other), marital status, diabetes, hypertension, small for gestational age, and rupture of membrane more than 24 hours before birth. Regression for neurodevelopmental impairment or death also adjusts for epoch and maternal education. The error bars indicate 95% CIs. aNot adjusted for center; model did not converge with center included.
  • JAMA Pediatrics April 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Multivariable Analysis of the Likelihood of Hospital Discharge to Home Health Care or Postacute Facility Care in Children

    Shown are the adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs of postacute facility care and home health care use after hospital discharge in children from the Kids’ Inpatient Database 2009. Reference groups were the following: (1) no chronic condition for the number of chronic conditions; (2) less than 1 year for age; (3) private insurance for payer; (4) Non-Hispanic white for race/ethnicity; (5) West for region; and (6) nonchildren’s hospital for freestanding children’s hospital.
  • JAMA Pediatrics April 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Variation Across States in the Use of Home Health Care After Acute Care Hospitalization in Children

    Shown are the point estimates and 95% CIs by state for the predicted/expected ratios of home health care use after acute hospitalization in children from the Kids’ Inpatient Database 2009. The Kids’ Inpatient Database includes 44 states. The estimates are adjusted for each state’s case mix of hospitalized children’s age, race/ethnicity, payer, and type and number of chronic conditions. The dotted line indicates a predicted/expected ratio of 1.0. States with significantly more or less predicted/expected use are labeled.
  • JAMA Pediatrics April 1, 2016

    Figure 3: Variation Across States in the Use of Facility-Based Postacute Care After Acute Care Hospitalization in Children

    Shown are the point estimates and 95% confidence intervals by state for the predicted/expected ratios of postacute facility care use after acute hospitalization in children from the Kids’ Inpatient Database 2009. The Kids’ Inpatient Database includes 44 states. The estimates are adjusted for each state’s case mix of hospitalized children’s age, race/ethnicity, payer, and type and number of chronic conditions. The dotted line indicates a predicted/expected ratio of 1.0. States with significantly more or less predicted/expected use are labeled.
  • Changes in Socioeconomic, Racial/Ethnic, and Sex Disparities in Childhood Obesity at School Entry in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(7):696-697. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.0172
  • Parental Cultural Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Young Children and Television

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(8):739-745. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.75

    Njoroge and colleagues examined the associations among child race/ethnicity, parental beliefs/attitudes about television and child development, and television viewing habits of young children. They also assessed the reasons for existing racial/ethnic disparities in children’s media use.

  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2013

    Figure: Recent Trends in Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Figure 1. Race/ethnicity-specific adjusted rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis: Kaiser Permanente Southern California (2001-2010). Adjustments were made for child age, sex, and median household income.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2013

    Figure: Recent Trends in Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Figure 2. Median household income–specific adjusted rate of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis: Kaiser Permanente Southern California (2001-2010). Adjustments were made for child age, sex, and race/ethnicity.
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 1, 2013

    Figure: Norms and Trends of Sleep Time Among US Children and Adolescents

    Figure 2. Median comparisons of the distribution of children's sleep by race/ethnicity and sex. A, By race/ethnicity; B, by sex.
  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Influence on Substance Use in Adolescent Social Networks

    Figure 2. Percentage of increase in risk (includes 95% confidence interval) of abusing alcohol, smoking, using marijuana, and binge drinking for an adolescent whose peer engages in the same behavior. All probabilities are estimated controlling for respondent age, sex, race, mother's education, mother's income, Wave I substance abuse, parent's Wave I and Wave II parenting style, friend's Wave I substance abuse, friend's parent's Wave I and Wave II parenting style, plus school-level fixed effects.
  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Influence on Substance Use in Adolescent Social Networks

    Figure 3. Percentage of decrease in risk (includes 95% confidence interval) of abusing alcohol, smoking, using marijuana, and binge drinking for adolescents whose parents are authoritative vs adolescents whose parents are neglectful. All probabilities are estimated controlling for respondent age, sex, race, mother's education, mother's income, Wave I substance abuse, parent's Wave I parenting style, friend's Wave I substance abuse, friend's parent's Wave I and Wave II parenting style, plus school-level fixed effects.
  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2012

    Figure: Parental Influence on Substance Use in Adolescent Social Networks

    Figure 4. Percentage of decrease in risk (includes 95% confidence interval) of abusing alcohol, smoking, using marijuana, and binge drinking for adolescents whose peers' parents are authoritative vs adolescents whose peers' parents are neglectful. All probabilities are estimated controlling for respondent age, sex, race, mother's education, mother's income, Wave I substance abuse, parent's Wave I and Wave II parenting style, friend's Wave I substance abuse, friend's parent's Wave I parenting style, plus school-level fixed effects.
  • Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Insulin Resistance in Urban High School Students of Minority Race/Ethnicity

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(11):1030-1036. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.1263
    Using BMI percentile group, Turchiano and colleagues compare the point prevalences of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components among 1185 high school students in New York City using 2 definitions of MetS, one a measure of impaired fasting plasma glucose level and the other an estimate of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.
  • Cranial Computed Tomography Use Among Children With Minor Blunt Head Trauma: Association With Race/Ethnicity

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(8):732-737. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.307
    To determine if race/ethnicity is independently associated with cranial computed tomography use, Natale and colleagues analyzed 39 717 children younger than 18 years who were seen in the emergency department within 24 hours of minor blunt head trauma, stratified by white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, or Hispanic race/ethnicity and classified for clinically important traumatic brain injury.
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2012

    Figure: Risk of Bottle-feeding for Rapid Weight Gain During the First Year of Life

    Figure. Mean and standard errors of monthly weight gain after adjusting for maternal age; race/ethnicity; education; household income; marital status; parity; postpartum Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children program participation; prepregnancy body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); infant sex; gestational age; birth weight; age at solid food introduction; and sweet drinks consumption.
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2012

    Figure: Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

    Figure. Associations of television viewing and eating behaviors by race/ethnicity and age. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of (A) drinking soda (≥1 instance per day) among all youth (A), eating fast food (≥1 d/wk) among all youth (B), and skipping breakfast at least 1 day per week among youth younger than 13 (C) associated with television viewing time (hours per day) by race/ethnicity. Error bars indicate 95% CIs. Associations with soda intake were significantly different for black compared with white youth (P = .001). Associations with fast food were significantly different for black (P = .001), Hispanic (P < .001), and “other” (P < .001) youth compared with white youth. Associations with skipping breakfast were significantly different for black (P < .001) and Hispanic (P = .006) youth compared with white youth. Odds ratios were adjusted for computer use, physical activity, age, sex, and family affluence.
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2012

    Figure: Selective Protection Against Extremes in Childhood Body Size, Abdominal Fat Deposition, and Fat Patterning in Breastfed Children

    Figure. Point estimates and 95% CIs (shaded areas) for differences in adiposity levels at selected percentiles between children with adequate and low levels of breastfeeding. The model was adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, Tanner stage, Tanner × age interaction, current total daily caloric intake, current physical activity score, maternal smoking during pregnancy, level of education, income, and prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared). A, Body mass index. B, Subcutaneous adipose tissue deposition (SAT). C, Visceral adipose tissue deposition (VAT). D, Ratio of subcutaneous to triceps skinfold (STR). E, Intramyocellular lipid accumulation (IMCL).
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 1, 2012

    Figure: Excess Body Mass Index–Years, a Measure of Degree and Duration of Excess Weight, and Risk for Incident Diabetes

    Figure 3. Lowess graphs showing the predicted first incidence of diabetes at a specific age, given that diabetes has not occurred at a previous age, in relation to excess body mass index (BMI)–years for individuals of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and other race.