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  • The New 2017 ACC/AHA Guidelines “Up the Pressure” on Diagnosis and Treatment of Hypertension

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    JAMA. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.18605
  • Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults

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    JAMA. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.18706

    This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the 2017 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults.

  • The 2017 Clinical Practice Guideline for High Blood Pressure

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    JAMA. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.18209

    This Viewpoint reviews key recommendations in the 2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure authored by the AHA, ACC, and 9 other specialty organizations, and highlights differences from the 2003 JNC 7 guideline.

  • JAMA September 19, 2017

    Figure 2: Mean Blood Pressure During Trial Follow-up in Intervention and Control Groups Among Patients With Hypertension

    Six blood pressure measurements were taken at baseline and at 18 months during 2 visits and 3 blood pressure measurements were taken at 6 months and 12 months during 1 visit. The data points represent the mean blood pressure; error bars, 95% CIs.
  • JAMA September 19, 2017

    Figure 3: Mean Difference in the Changes of Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Among Patients With Hypertension by Subgroups

    Mean differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure changes from baseline to the 18-month follow-up between the intervention and control groups. Data markers indicate mean difference in the changes; error bars, 95% CIs. aHigh cardiovascular risk subgroup includes participants with a history of coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, or diabetes. Those without these risk factors are considered not at high risk.
  • Effect of a Community Health Worker–Led Multicomponent Intervention on Blood Pressure Control in Low-Income Patients in Argentina: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(11):1016-1025. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.11358

    This cluster randomized trial compares the effects on blood pressure control of a community health worker–led home intervention vs physician education vs patient text messaging among low-income patients with hypertension in Argentina.

  • JAMA September 19, 2017

    Figure 1: Flow Diagram of Trial Participants

    Participants who did not have hypertension were the spouses of patients with hypertension (<140/90 mm Hg) and did not use antihypertensive medications. Although many centers met the eligibility criteria, 18 were recommended based on their geographic distribution, their willingness to participate, and their previous experience collaborating with the coordinating center. The centers were not randomly selected.
  • Checking Blood Pressure at Home

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):310-310. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6670
  • Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults Without Cardiovascular Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(2):167-174. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7171

    This Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that primary care professionals individualize the decision to refer adults without obesity and cardiovascular risk factors to behavioral counseling to promote healthful diet and physical activity (C recommendation).

  • Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults Without Known Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force

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    JAMA. 2017; 318(2):175-193. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.3303

    This Evidence Report and systematic review to support a 2017 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement summarizes current evidence on benefits and harms of behavioral counseling for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults without known CVD risk factors.

  • JAMA July 11, 2017

    Figure 1: Analytic Framework

    Evidence reviews for the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) use an analytic framework to visually display the key questions that the review will address to allow the USPSTF to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a preventive service. The questions are depicted by linkages that relate interventions and outcomes. A dashed line indicates a relationship between an intermediate outcome and a health outcome that is presumed to describe the natural progression of the disease. Further details are available in the USPSTF procedure manual.aHigh risk of cardiovascular disease includes adults with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, impaired fasting glucose or glucose tolerance, or a combination of these factors.
  • The DASH Diet, 20 Years Later

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(15):1529-1530. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.1628

    This Viewpoint discusses ways to improve adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which comprises foods rich in protein and fiber, limits foods high in saturated fat and sugar, and was shown in 1997 to lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension and prehypertension.

  • JAMA April 11, 2017

    Figure 1: Adjusted Odds Ratios for Global Cortex Florbetapir SUVRs >1.2 by Number of Vascular Risk Factors, Midlife Through Late Life

    Adjusted odds ratios (with 95% CIs as error bars) are shown for number of vascular risk factors for visits 1 through 5 for standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) >1.2. Models are adjusted for age (at visit 5, 2011-2013), sex, race, education level, and APOE ε4 genotype. Vascular risk factors include body mass index ≥30, current smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and total cholesterol level ≥200 mg/dL.
  • Hypertension in 2017—What Is the Right Target?

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(6):579-580. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.0105

    In this Viewpoint, Chobanian proposes blood pressure goals for treatment of hypertension in light of data from the ACCORD, SPRINT, and HOPE-3 trials, which tested differences in patient outcomes by treatment targets.

  • Hypertension Control for 10 Million

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(4):352-352. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.20203
  • Thiazide Diuretics Protect Bones as Well as Hearts

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(4):351-351. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19038
  • Highest Blood Pressure Levels Shift From Rich to Poor Countries

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(3):246-246. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.20449
  • Global Burden of Hypertension and Systolic Blood Pressure of at Least 110 to 115 mm Hg, 1990-2015

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    JAMA. 2017; 317(2):165-182. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19043

    This population epidemiology study uses pooled global health evaluation surveys data to estimate trends in the association between elevated stystolic blood pressure and death and disability between 1990 and 2015.

  • JAMA December 13, 2016

    Figure 1: Flow of Patients Through the GLAGOV Randomized Clinical Trial

    aPatients could be excluded for more than 1 reason; therefore, the sum of the criteria may be greater than the number of patients. CETP indicates cholesterylester transfer protein; GLAGOV, Global Assessment of Plaque Regression With a PCSK9 Antibody as Measured by Intravascular Ultrasound; IVUS, intravascular ultrasonography; LDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.bLDL-C level 80 mg/dL (2.07 mmol/L) or greater, with or without risk factors; less than 60 mg/dL (1.55 mmol/L); or 60 mg/dL or greater to less than 80 mg/dL.cClinically significant heart disease (154), hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism (38), type 1 diabetes (27), history of malignancy (16), fasting triglyceride level greater than 400 mg/dL (4.52 mmol/L) (15), active liver disease or hepatic dysfunction (11), uncontrolled cardiac arrhythmia (4), creatine kinase level greater than 3 times upper limit of normal (2), history of hereditary muscular disorders (2), known active infection or systemic dysfunctions (2), New York Heart Association III or IV heart failure or left ventricular ejection fraction less than 30% (2), severe renal dysfunction (1), uncontrolled hypertension (1).