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  • A Maker Movement for Health: A New Paradigm for Health Innovation

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(2):107-108. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.3747

    This Viewpoint describes the contributions of the Maker Movement to health care innovation and discusses future challenges and opportunities for the movement.

  • Evolution of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Parents of Very Preterm Infants During the Newborn Period

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(9):863-870. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0810

    This cohort study describes the rates of depression and anxiety among parents of very preterm infants in the first 12 weeks of life, and compares rates at 6 months with those of parents of healthy full-term infants.

  • Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication and Adolescent Safer Sex Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(1):52-61. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.2731

    This meta-analysis estimates correlations between parent-adolescent communication about sex and safe sex behaviors among youths.

  • Challenges in Prevention of Abusive Head Trauma

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(12):1093-1094. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3023
  • JAMA Pediatrics January 5, 2015

    Figure 1: Study Population Flow Diagram

    aWe deduplicated the list as people could register for the lottery multiple times.bMore than 1 applicant per household could be included. Households were defined by the mother, and 120 fathers were in more than 1 household.cMore than 1 applicant per household could be included. Households were defined by the mother, and 165 fathers were in more than 1 household.
  • JAMA Pediatrics August 1, 2012

    Figure: Frequency of Parent-Supervised Outdoor Play of US Preschool-Aged Children

    Figure. Frequency of children's outdoor play with their mother and father.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2011

    Figure 4: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Intranasal examination of the patient’s father.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2011

    Figure 4: Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

    Intranasal examination of the patient’s father.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2011

    Figure 3: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Red spots on the hands of the patient's father.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2011

    Figure 3: Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

    Red spots on the hands of the patient's father.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011; 165(3):275-276. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.2-a
  • Incidence of Maternal and Paternal Depression in Primary Care: A Cohort Study Using a Primary Care Database

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010; 164(11):1038-1044. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.184
    Objective

    To examine incidence, trends, and correlates of parental depression in primary care from 0 to 12 years of child age.

    Design

    Prospective cohort study.

    Setting

    Primary care records from more than 350 general practices in The Health Improvement Network database from 1993 to 2007.

    Participants

    A total of 86 957 mother, father, and child triads identified in The Health Improvement Network database by linking mothers and babies and then identifying an adult household man. Depressed parents were identified using Read code entries for depression and antidepressant prescriptions.

    Main Exposures

    Child age, parental age at the birth, and area deprivation quintile.

    Main Outcome Measures

    Incidence rates for maternal and paternal episodes of depression.

    Results

    Overall incidences of depression from the birth of the child up to age 12 years were 7.53 per 100 person-years for mothers and 2.69 per 100 person-years for fathers. Depression was highest in the first year post partum (13.93 and 3.56 per 100 person-years among mothers and fathers, respectively). By 12 years of child age, 39% of mothers and 21% of fathers had experienced an episode of depression. A history of depression, lower parental age at the birth of the child, and higher social deprivation were associated with a higher incidence of parental depression.

    Conclusions

    Parents are at highest risk for depression in the first year after the birth of their child. Parents with a history of depression, younger parents, and those from deprived areas are particularly vulnerable to depression. There is a need for appropriate recognition and management of parental depression in primary care.

  • Parental Reactions to Information About Increased Genetic Risk of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Infants

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006; 160(11):1131-1136. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.160.11.1131
  • JAMA Pediatrics November 1, 2006

    Figure: Parental Reactions to Information About Increased Genetic Risk of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Infants

    Distribution of the anxiety scores of mothers (A) and fathers (B) of infants with vs without increased genetic risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus.
  • Mental Illness in Fathers

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005; 159(2):195-197. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.159.2.197-b
  • JAMA Pediatrics August 1, 2004

    Figure 1: Combined Effect of Mothers' and Fathers' Mental Health Symptoms on Children's Behavioral and Emotional Well-being

    Association of mothers' and fathers' mental health symptoms using the Children's Behavior Problem Index–Externalizing (BPI-EXT) scale. The analysis of variance compares the mean BPI scores across paternal mental health quartiles within each maternal mental health quartile with the first quartile being the lowest K10 score and the fourth quartile the highest K10 score.
  • JAMA Pediatrics August 1, 2004

    Figure 2: Combined Effect of Mothers' and Fathers' Mental Health Symptoms on Children's Behavioral and Emotional Well-being

    Association of mothers' and fathers' mental health symptoms using the Children's Behavior Problem Index–Internalizing (BPI-INT) subscale. The analysis of variance compares the mean BPI scores across paternal mental health quartiles within each maternal mental health quartile with the first quartile being the lowest and the fourth quartile the highest K10 score.
  • Combined Effect of Mothers' and Fathers' Mental Health Symptoms on Children's Behavioral and Emotional Well-being

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004; 158(8):721-729. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.158.8.721
  • JAMA Pediatrics October 1, 2003

    Figure: Traumatic Low Attenuation Subdural Fluid Collections in Children Younger Than 3 Years

    Computed tomographic scans of a 6-month-old male child abuse victim, who had been struck in the face and violently shaken by his father. A, Two hours after the injury. The arrows indicate minimal high attenuation clotted blood in the right convexity and posterior interhemispheric subdural spaces. Note the normal generous subarachnoid spaces in the frontal regions, with accompanying normal adjacent sulci. B, Two days after the injury. The arrows indicate small bilateral low attenuation convexity subdural fluid collections. The subdural fluid produces slightly higher attenuation than does the adjacent clear cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space. C, Six days after the injury, there are larger bilateral subdural fluid collections that are indistinguishable from chronic hygromas. The adjacent sulci are effaced, and cerebral edema is present. There is an increase in high attenuation clotted blood in the posterior interhemispheric fissure. D, Eleven days after the injury, there are increased sizes of the subdural fluid collections, with compression of the adjacent portions of the cerebrum. The posterior interhemispheric subdural hematoma has almost disappeared.
  • Pathological Case of the Month

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155(11):1275-1276. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.155.11.1275