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  • Pneumonia in Children Presenting to the Emergency Department With an Asthma Exacerbation

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(8):803-805. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0310

    This cohort study aims to identify risk factors for pneumonia in children with asthma exacerbations.

  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2015

    Figure: Activity Distribution by Category, Interns and Residents Combined (Percentage of Time per 24 Hours)

    Major activity categories included subactivities as follows: waiting for something to respond or arrive (computer, paper, patient, telephone), looking for items or people (colleague, consultant, nurse, patient, supplies, telephone, computer, or patient medical record information), paper-write (writing notes on the printed handoff document; handwritten patient notes, orders, or prescriptions), paper-read (reviewing printed handoff document or part of patient record printed on paper, reading reference materials), education (formal education such as grand rounds or didactic lectures, informal medical education such as learning about a disease process during patient rounds, or patient service learning such as learning how to order a test in the electronic medical record, teaching medical students or residents medical information or patient service activities), telephone (answering or reading pager, paging colleague, getting results, scheduling a test/appointment, telephone call with patient/family members, physicians, nurses, medical students, other staff, or personal telephone calls), patient/family contact (taking patient history, casual conversation, physical examination, explaining the plan of care, educating patient, obtaining consent, discussing advance directives, or conducting medical procedures), personal (eating, sleeping, idle, walking, restroom, talking, personal texting/mobile telephone use, in call room, or donning contact precautions), computer-write (typing into the handoff document, email, sending a text page, writing patient notes, discharge summaries, orders, prescriptions, or incident reports), computer-read (reviewing computerized sign-out, patient record, electrocardiograms, chest radiography, or other patient information; reading email, reference articles, or other online reference material), and interprofessional communication (giving or receiving sign-out; listening to patient presentations or communicating with nurses, medical students, physicians, other staff, or multiple people).
  • Establishing Superior Benchmarks of Care in Clinical Practice: A Proposal to Drive Achievable Health Care Value

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(4):301-302. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.3580

    This Viewpoint supports establishing superior benchmarks of care in clinical practice. Establishing achievable excellence is an approach that encourages improvement while not demanding unrealistic or potentially adverse outcomes.

  • JAMA Pediatrics August 1, 2014

    Figure: An 18-Year-Old Man With Bilateral Violaceous Cervical Adenopathy

    A, Bilateral level IV (low jugular) cervical adenopathy. B, Chest radiograph showing bilateral hilar adenopathy. C, Histological examination of the excised lymph node showing multiple spherules containing endospores (arrowheads) (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×200).
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2013

    Figure 1: Standard Chest Radiograph

    Hyperexpansion of the right lung, mediastinal shift to the left, and opacified left hemithorax.
  • JAMA Pediatrics May 1, 2013

    Figure: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Figure 2. Plain chest radiograph at initial presentation.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(5):483-483. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.7a
  • Prospective Evaluation of Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children and Young Adults

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(2):119-125. doi: 10.1001/2013.jamapediatrics.107
    To determine the accuracy of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pneumonia in youth, Shah et al studied 200 patients at 2 emergency departments who were undergoing chest radiography for suspected pneumonia. After documenting clinical findings, clinicians with 1 hour of focused training used ultrasonography to diagnose pneumonia. See the editorial by Darge and Chen.
  • JAMA Pediatrics February 1, 2013

    Figure: Prospective Evaluation of Point-of-Care Ultrasonography for the Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children and Young Adults

    Figure 2. Lung consolidation of 1 cm or less with sonographic air bronchograms on ultrasonography not detected by chest radiography. F indicates frontal view; RT, right; and red oval, lung consolidation. A is caliper A measurement, and B is caliper B measurement.
  • JAMA Pediatrics October 1, 2012

    Figure: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Figure. Chest radiograph showing multiple right-sided cystlike lesions (arrow) and mild contralateral displacement of the heart and other mediastinal structures. Scoliosis (double-headed arrow), hemivertebrae (asterisks), and diaphragmatic hernia (arrow) are readily seen.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(10):959-959. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.1647
  • Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(10):960-960. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.166.10.960
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(8):767-767. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.503a
  • JAMA Pediatrics September 1, 2011

    Figure: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Figure 1. Chest radiograph demonstrates pneumomediastinum with subcutaneous emphysema. Additionally, there is near-complete collapse of the left lung with associated leftward mediastinal shift.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011; 165(9):865-865. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.141-a
  • JAMA Pediatrics October 1, 2010

    Figure 1: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Chest radiography on presentation showing an encapsulated structure (arrow) in the left lower zone with an air-fluid level.
  • JAMA Pediatrics October 1, 2010

    Figure 2: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Chest radiography was repeated following the development of acute respiratory distress and revealed a tension pneumothorax (arrow pointing at an absence of lung markings on the left side of the chest). L indicates left.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010; 164(10):973-973. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.171-a
  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2009

    Figure 3: Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Chest radiograph.
  • Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009; 163(12):1157-1157. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.221-a