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  • Association Between Adolescent Preventive Care and the Role of the Affordable Care Act

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.3140

    This secondary analysis of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data examines whether adolescent well visit rates increased from the pre– to post–Affordable Care Act periods and whether caregivers’ reports of past-year preventive services delivery increased from the pre– to post–Affordable Care Act periods among adolescents with any past-year health care visit.

  • Truth Telling in the Setting of Cultural Differences and Incurable Pediatric Illness: A Review

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(11):1113-1119. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.2568

    This review explores suggestions for respectful and ethically appropriate responses to nondisclosure requests from the families and caregivers of seriously ill children.

  • Bridging Knowledge Gaps to Understand How Zika Virus Exposure and Infection Affect Child Development

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(5):478-485. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0002

    This Special Communication summarizes the issues discussed at the Bridging Knowledge Gaps to Understand How Zika Virus Exposure and Infection Affect Child Development workshop.

  • Families as Partners in Hospital Error and Adverse Event Surveillance

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(4):372-381. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.4812

    This cohort study compares family-reported error and adverse event rates with rates detected by other sources.

  • A Maker Movement for Health: A New Paradigm for Health Innovation

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(2):107-108. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.3747

    This Viewpoint describes the contributions of the Maker Movement to health care innovation and discusses future challenges and opportunities for the movement.

  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2016

    Figure 3: Adjusted Kaplan-Meier Curves After Balancing Procedures Are Completed With Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting

    The curves use adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimator and log-rank test with inverse probability of treatment weighting. Using the trimmed inverse probability of treatment weighting, the log-rank test provides P = .04 in panel A and P = .16 in panel B. A, Comparison of an unadjusted model with a model adjusted for pertinent socioeconomic hardship variables. Adjusted model in panel A includes measures of financial and social hardship, caregiver educational attainment, and caregiver marital status. B, Comparison of an unadjusted model with a model adjusted for pertinent socioeconomic hardship, biological, environmental exposure, disease management, and access to care variables. Adjusted model in panel B includes measures of outdoor allergen sensitization, salivary cotinine, traffic-related air pollution, running out of or missing dose of medication, and vehicle ownership alongside measures of financial and social hardship, caregiver educational attainment, and caregiver marital status.
  • Effectiveness of a Multicomponent Sun Protection Program for Young Children: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(4):334-342. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.4373

    This randomized clinical trial determines whether a multicomponent sun protection program delivered in pediatric clinics during the summer could increase summertime sun protection among young children.

  • Effectiveness of a Statewide Abusive Head Trauma Prevention Program in North Carolina

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(12):1126-1131. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.2690

    This comparison study of parents of newborns in North Carolina assessed the effectiveness of a statewide universal abusive head trauma prevention program using nurse advice line telephone calls for infant crying concerns.

  • Validity and Responsiveness of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales in the Pediatric Inpatient Setting

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(12):1114-1121. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1600

    This prospective, cohort study of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales demonstrated responsiveness, construct validity, and predictive validity in hospitalized pediatric patients.

  • Prompting Asthma Intervention in Rochester–Uniting Parents and Providers (PAIR-UP): A Randomized Trial

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(10):e141983. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1983

    This randomized trial evaluated whether the Prompting Asthma Intervention in Rochester–Uniting Parents and Providers (PAIR-UP) intervention improved the delivery of preventive care and reduced morbidity for urban children with asthma.

  • Ethics and Etiquette in Neonatal Intensive Care

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(9):857-858. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.527

    Janvier and Lantos offer practical recommendations that will assist health care professionals in helping parents who have a child in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  • The Effects of Poverty on Childhood Brain Development: The Mediating Effect of Caregiving and Stressful Life Events

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(12):1135-1142. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3139

    Luby and colleagues investigated whether the income-to-needs ratio experienced in early childhood impacts brain development at school age and explored the mediators of this effect. Charles A. Nelson, PhD, provided a related editorial.

  • JAMA Pediatrics December 1, 2013

    Figure 2: Caregivers’ Education, Supportive/Hostile Parenting, and Children’s Experiences of Stressful Life Events as Mediators of the Relation Between Income-to-Needs Ratio and Hippocampus Volumes

    Values shown are standardized regression coefficients. The top model is for the left (L) hippocampus volume, while the model at the bottom represents the right (R) hippocampus volume. Both models include whole-brain volume and sex as covariates.aMeasured at baseline.bP < .001.cMeasured after baseline but before scan.dP < .01.eP < .05.fAfter adding parents’ education, supportive/hostile parenting, and children’s stressful life events to the model.gTime of scan.
  • The Economic Impact of Childhood Food Allergy in the United States

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(11):1026-1031. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.2376

    Gupta et al determine the economic impact of childhood food allergy in the United States and caregivers’ willingness to pay for food allergy treatment.

  • Baseline Factors Predicting Placebo Response to Treatment in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Multisite Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(11):1045-1052. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.2698

    King and coauthors identify possible nonspecific, baseline predictors of response to intervention in a large randomized clinical trial of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. See also the editorial by Arnold.

  • JAMA Pediatrics November 1, 2013

    Figure 2: Relationship Between Baseline Composite Predictor Measures Dichotomized at the Median and Response to Treatment at Week 12

    The arrows, the relative risk (RR), and the corresponding 95% CI pertain to the placebo group and are interpreted as the likelihood of response if the participant entered the study with a composite score below the median value of Disruptive Behavior (A), Mood/Autism (B), and Caregiver Strain (C). Response to citalopram hydrobromide was not affected by the baseline predictor composite score.
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences and Child Health in Early Adolescence

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(7):622-629. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.22

    Flaherty and colleagues conducted a prospective analysis of the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect data to examine the relationship between previous adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and somatic concerns and health problems in early adolescence, as well as the role of the timing of adverse exposures.

  • Violence, Crime, and Abuse Exposure in a National Sample of Children and Youth: An Update

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(7):614-621. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.42

    Finkelhor et al provide updated estimates of and trends for childhood exposure to a broad range of violence, crime, and abuse victimizations. Using a national telephone survey, the experiences of 4503 children and youth aged 1 month to 17 years were assessed by interviews with caregivers and with youth in the case of those aged 10 to 17 years.

  • Resolution of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Behavior Problems After Investigation for Suspected Child Maltreatment

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    JAMA Pediatr. 2013; 167(3):236-242. doi: 10.1001/2013.jamapediatrics.324
    Campbell and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study of 320 children with caregiver-reported intimate partner violence (IPV) included in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being to describe longitudinal change in child behavior problems associated with IPV resolution after an investigation for suspected child maltreatment. Asnes and Leventhal provide a related editorial.
  • JAMA Pediatrics March 1, 2013

    Figure: Resolution of Intimate Partner Violence and Child Behavior Problems After Investigation for Suspected Child Maltreatment

    Figure 1. Adjusted probability and adjusted risk ratios (ARRs) of clinically significant internalizing child behavior problems after a child protective services (CPS) investigation for suspected child maltreatment among children with and without persistence of caregiver-reported intimate partner violence (IPV). The numbers along the top indicate the ARRs (95% CIs) for persistent vs resolved IPV.