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  • JAMA Pediatrics June 1, 2017

    Figure: Alarm Data Flow Diagram

    The analysis examined response time to the 3280 “out-of-room” alarms that (1) occurred while no clinicians were in the patient’s room or were viewing the central monitoring station, and (2) sent automatic text messages to the bedside nurse (alarms for asystole, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, apnea, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter, probe off, and/or leads fail).
  • Association of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation With Overall and Neurologically Favorable Survival After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States: A Report From the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival Surveillance Registry

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(2):133-141. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.3643

    This analysis of data from the US Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival database characterizes bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

  • Goodbyes Are Not Forever

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(2):109-109. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2382
  • Survival Rates Following Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests During Nights and Weekends

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(1):39-45. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2535

    This national registry-based cohort study reports on whether outcomes after pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrests differ during nights and weekends compared with days/evenings and weekdays.

  • Differences in the Quality of Pediatric Resuscitative Care Across a Spectrum of Emergency Departments

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2016; 170(10):987-994. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.1550

    This study measures and compares the quality of resuscitative care delivered to simulated pediatric patients across a spectrum of pediatric emergency departments and general emergency departments in the United States.

  • JAMA Pediatrics October 1, 2016

    Figure: Composite Quality Score of Pediatric Emergency Departments to General Emergency Departments

    Each axis of the radar graph represents a separate metric; clockwise from top: teamwork, sepsis adherence, cardiac arrest adherence, and seizure adherence. The darker shade represents the mean score on each metric by general emergency departments and the lighter shade represents the mean score on each metric by pediatric emergency departments.
  • High-Value, Cost-Conscious Medical Education

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2015; 169(2):109-111. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.2964
  • Impact of Rapid Response System Implementation on Critical Deterioration Events in Children

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(1):25-33. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3266

    Bonafide et al evaluate the impact of pediatric rapid response system implementation inclusive of a medical emergency team and an early warning score on critical deterioration, a proximate outcome defined as unplanned transfer to the intensive care unit with noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation or vasopressor infusion in the 12 hours after transfer. Alobaidi and Joffe provide commentary in a related editorial.

  • Are Critical Deterioration Events the Right Metric to Determine the Impact of Rapid Response Systems?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2014; 168(1):9-10. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3868
  • Variation in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Outcomes in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012; 166(7):641-647. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.322
    In children with traumatic brain injury, Bennett and coauthors conducted a retrospective chort study to describe between-hospital and patient-level variations in intracranial pressure monitoring and to evaluate intracranial pressure monitoring in association with hospital features and outcome.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2006

    Figure: Brain Death: Understanding of the Conceptual Basis by Pediatric Intensivists in Canada

    Concept used to justify brain death, used by the 36 respondents who agreed the conceptual basis makes brain death equivalent to death. The exact question asked was as follows: “This patient fulfills all brain death criteria unequivocally including the suitable interval. Conceptually, why are they dead?” CA indicates cardiac arrest; QOL, quality of life.
  • JAMA Pediatrics July 1, 2006

    Figure: Brain Death: Understanding of the Conceptual Basis by Pediatric Intensivists in Canada

    eFigure. Details of the questionnaire. Certain definitions were agreed on a priori for 2 of the survey questions. The first question asked to choose “stand-alone” reason(s) that “is/are an acceptable conceptual reason to explain why ‘brain death’ is equivalent to ‘death.’” For analysis, we classified responses into categories that have been discussed in the literature. A higher brain concept of brain death (BD) response was considered any of irreversible loss of consciousness, irreversible loss of the soul or “the essence” of man, or irreversible loss of “personhood.” A prognosis concept of BD response was considered any of the certainty of cardiac arrest within hours or days or further care is futile and/or degrading. A statement of loss of brain function response (this is the criterion, and not a concept, to justify why this loss of brain function was death) was considered any of irreversible loss of the function of the entire brain, including the brainstem, or irreversible loss of the critical functions of the entire brain, including the brainstem. Similarly, the seventh question asked “This patient fulfills all brain death criteria unequivocally, including the suitable interval. Conceptually, why are they dead (ie, in your own words, what is it about loss of brain function including the brainstem that makes this patient dead)?” We planned to divide responses into the same categories as previously described. After reviewing the returned surveys, the following was used to categorize the narrative responses. A higher brain concept of BD was considered any mention of consciousness, ability to interact, personhood, the soul, the self, or “a unique individual.” A loss of integration of body concept of BD was considered any mention of ability to breathe, maintain homeostasis, or maintain integration. A quality-of-life statement was considered any mention of quality of life or “reasonable survival.” A prognosis of death being certain statement was considered any mention of inevitable cardiac arrest, “the patient will die soon,” or “maintaining life on machines.” The quality-of-life and prognosis of death statements were combined as the prognosis concept of BD. Any response that stated only that the brain has died, the patient fulfills the BD criteria, there is no brain function, or BD is an accepted standard was considered a statement (of “fact”) only (the criterion, and not a concept, to justify why this loss of brain function was death). EEG indicates electroencephalogram; TSH, thyrotropin.
  • Pathological Case of the Month

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155(8):967-968. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.155.8.967
  • Pathological Case of the Month

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155(6):737-738. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.155.6.737
  • Pathological Case of the Month

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001; 155(4):517-518. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.155.4.517
  • Different Pediatric Survival After Cardiac Arrest

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(7):708-709. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0860
  • Different Pediatric Survival After Cardiac Arrest—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(7):709-709. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0876
  • Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Pushing for Progress in Public Response

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Pediatr. 2017; 171(2):113-115. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.3694
  • Failure of Electrocardiographic Monitoring to Detect Cardiac Arrest in Patients With Pacemakers

    Abstract Full Text
    Am J Dis Child. 1989; 143(1):105-107. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1989.02150130115028
  • Successful Treatment of Cardiac Arrest During Exchange Transfusion

    Abstract Full Text
    AMA Am J Dis Child. 1959; 97(5_PART_I):616-617. doi: 10.1001/archpedi.1959.02070010618012