0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Article |

Nutrient Intakes by Young Children in a Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low—Saturated Fat, Low-Cholesterol Diet:  The STRIP Baby Project

Hanna Lagström, MSc; Eero Jokinen, MD; Ritva Seppänen, DSc; Tapani Rönnemaa, MD; Jorma Viikari, MD; Ilkka Välimäki, MD; Jaana Venetoklis, MSc; Asta Myyrinmaa, MS; Harri Niinikoski, MD; Helena Lapinleimu, MD; Olli Simell, MD
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(2):181-188. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1997.02170390071013.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective:  To evaluate the impact of individualized and repeatedly given dietary counseling on fat intake and nutrient intake of children aged 8 months to 4 years.

Design:  Prospective randomized clinical trial.

Participants:  Children (N= 1062) from 1054 families were randomized to an intervention (n=540) or a control (n=522) group when each child participant was 6 months old.

Interventions:  The children in the intervention group were counseled to reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol but to ensure their adequate energy intake. Dietary issues were discussed with the families of the children in the control group only briefly according to the current practice of well-baby clinics.

Main Outcome Measures:  Food consumption was evaluated by using 3- and 4-day food records that were kept at 5- to 12-month intervals, and nutrient intakes were analyzed with a Micro Nutrica computer program (Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland).

Results:  The intake of fat (29% of the energy intake) and cholesterol (70 mg) showed no differences between the groups of children at 8 months of age. The fat intake in the children in the intervention group was then continuously 2% of the energy intake below that of the children in the control group (P<.001). After the age of 13 months, the cholesterol intake of the children in the control group exceeded that of the children in the intervention group by 20 mg (P<.001). The children in the intervention group consumed 3% (of the energy intake) less saturated (P<.001) and 1% (of the energy intake) more polyunsaturated fats (P<.001) than did the children in the control group at age 13 months and older. The carbohydrate intake was slightly higher in the children in the intervention group than in the children in the control group. Intakes of vitamins, minerals, and trace elements showed no differences between the 2 groups.

Conclusions:  The intakes of fat by the children in the intervention and control groups were markedly below values that were recommended for the first 2 years of life. Despite the low intake of fat, the intake of other nutrients fulfilled current recommendations, except for vitamin D and iron. Individualized dietary counseling that led to clear changes in the type of fat intake had a minimal effect on vitamin or mineral intakes.Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151:181-188

Topics

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();