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Special Feature |

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case FREE

Melanie Pitone, MD; Benjamin Alouf, MD
[+] Author Affiliations

Section Editor: Albert C. Yan, MD
Assistant Section Editor: Samir S. Shah, MD


Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2006;160(3):300. doi:10.1001/archpedi.160.3.300.
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An otherwise healthy 3-month-old male infant had umbilical erythema and watery stools. He had been slightly fussy and cried during feeding. His parents reported intermittent emesis and diarrhea over the last several weeks, with body temperature to 38.8°C. During this illness, he developed redness of the umbilicus that, after resolving spontaneously, recurred over the last 2 days.

On examination, his weight was 7.1 kg (75th percentile); temperature, 38.1°C; heart rate, 153/min; respiratory rate, 40/min; blood pressure, 62/47 mm Hg; and oxygen saturation, 98% on room air. He appeared mildly ill, pale, and quiet. His lips were dry, he had a 2/6 flow murmur heard best at the left sternal border, his skin was mottled, and his feet were cool. The abdomen was soft without apparent tenderness. Periumbilical erythema and induration extended a distance of 0.5 cm around the umbilicus.

Initial laboratory testing revealed a white blood cell count of 34 800/μL, with a differential of 60% neutrophils and 26% lymphocytes. The hemoglobin level was 10.3 g/dL, the platelet count was 1.103 × 106/μL, and the C-reactive protein level was 2.9 mg/dL. Abdominal radiography revealed a single dilated loop of bowel in the midabdomen with adjacent thickening of the anterior abdominal wall. Isotonic saline improved his perfusion and color. The patient began receiving intravenous piperacillin and tazobactam for broad-spectrum bowel and skin flora coverage.

The following day, the surrounding erythema had improved. However, spontaneous purulent drainage was noted at the umbilicus (Figure 1), so an ultrasound was performed (Figure 2).

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Figure 1.

Erythema and purulent collection at the umbilicus. Methicillin sodium–sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a culture of drainage fluid.

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Figure 2.

The ultrasound revealed an infected urachal remnant associated with urinary retention.

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Figures

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Figure 1.

Erythema and purulent collection at the umbilicus. Methicillin sodium–sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from a culture of drainage fluid.

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Figure 2.

The ultrasound revealed an infected urachal remnant associated with urinary retention.

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The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
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