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Comment & Response |

Supplemental Feedings for High-Risk Preterm Infants ONLINE FIRST

Maryanne T. Perrin, PhD1; Paula M. Sisk, PhD2
[+] Author Affiliations
1University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro
2Novant Health Forsyth Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 19, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2355
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To the Editor Understanding the effect of exposure to bovine-based formulas and fortifiers is an important area of research for optimizing outcomes and feeding protocols for very low-birth-weight infants. In their article studying the effect of supplementing with donor milk vs preterm formula in the first 10 days of life when mother’s own milk was insufficient, Corpeleijn et al1 concluded “supplemental feeding during the first 10 days of life yielded similar short-term outcomes.”1 This conclusion deserves the important qualification “when infants are receiving greater than 85% intake from mother’s own milk” to put this study in context with what is known in the literature. Sisk et al2 found that very low-birth-weight infants who received at least 50% human milk intake during the first 14 days of life had necrotizing enterocolitis rates of 3.2% compared with 10.9% in infants who received less than 50% human milk intake (P < .05).2 In a small randomized trial where infants received 100% fortified donor human milk or 100% preterm formula, Cristofalo et al3 reported necrotizing enterocolitis rates of 3% vs 21%, respectively (P = .08). A 2016 retrospective study by Colaizy et al4 concluded that infants receiving a 100% formula diet had an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis compared with infants receiving at least 98% fortified mother’s milk (adjusted odds ratio, 12.1; 95% CI, 1.5-94.1).4

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September 19, 2016
Hope K. Lima, MS; Ronald S. Cohen, MD; Thomas E. Young, MD
1Department of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh
2Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
3Division of Neonatology, WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Raleigh, North Carolina
JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 19, 2016.;():. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2352.
September 19, 2016
Arthur I. Eidelman, MD
1Hebrew University School of Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 19, 2016.;():. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2361.
September 19, 2016
Sergio Verd, MD
1Pediatric Unit, La Vileta Surgery, Department of Primary Care, Baleares Health Authority, Balaeres, Spain2Health Sciences Research Institute, Balearic University, Baleares, Spain
JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 19, 2016.;():. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2364.
September 19, 2016
Marita de Waard, MD; Willemijn E. Corpeleijn, MD; Johannes B. van Goudoever, MD, PhD
1Department of Pediatrics, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
1Department of Pediatrics, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands2Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
JAMA Pediatr. Published online September 19, 2016.;():. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2358.
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