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Comment & Response |

Prenatal Antidepressant Use and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Children

Alain Lesage, MD, MPhil1,2; Fatoumata Binta Diallo, PhD2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Québec, Canada
2Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Québec, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):714. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0733.
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To the Editor We are very familiar with the linked health administrative databases used by Boukhris et al1 in their article investigating the association between prenatal antidepressant use and risk of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring. Therefore, we have 3 suggestions to bring more light to their report. We have been running a Canadian Institutes of Health Research–funded research project to define diagnostic codes for a series of childhood-onset mental disorders together with the Quebec Chronic Disease Surveillance System of the Quebec Public Health Agency.2 We reported our preliminary results both to the Ministry of Health and Social Services and to a continuing medical education symposium on autism spectrum disorder held by Quebec’s Federation of Medical Specialists and attended mainly by public health medical specialists, psychiatrists, and pediatricians.3

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July 1, 2016
Yusuf Cem Kaplan, MD; Elif Keskin-Arslan, MD; Selin Acar
1Department of Pharmacology, Izmir Katip Celebi University School of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey2Terafar-Izmir Katip Celebi University Teratology Information, Training and Research Center, Izmir, Turkey
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):712. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0727.
July 1, 2016
Pascal Bédard, BPharm, MSc
1Department of Pharmacy, Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):712-713. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0730.
July 1, 2016
Nicholas A. Link, PharmD, BCOP; Mary E. Temple-Cooper, MS, PharmD, BCPS
1Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Oncology, Hillcrest Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Mayfield Heights, Ohio
2Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Obstetrics, Neonatology and Pediatrics. Hillcrest Hospital, Cleveland Clinic, Mayfield Heights, Ohio
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):713-714. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0736.
July 1, 2016
Keith Fluegge, BA
1Institute of Health and Environmental Research, Cleveland, Ohio
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):710. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0739.
July 1, 2016
Adrienne Einarson, RN, PhD; Carly Snyder, MD; Gail Robinson, MD, DPsych, FRCPC
1The Reproductive Psychiatry Group, The Hospital for Sick Children (retired), Toronto, Canada
2Health Program, Family Health Associates, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York3Women's Mental Health Elective, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York
4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada5Women's Mental Health Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):710-711. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0742.
July 1, 2016
Eric Fombonne, MD
1Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):711-712. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0745.
July 1, 2016
Anick Bérard, PhD; Takoua Boukhris, MSc
1Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada2Research Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(7):714-715. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.0748.
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