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This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(4):308. doi:10.1001/archpedi.156.4.308.
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PREVALENCE AND PATTERNS OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AMONG ADOLESCENT MOTHERS DURING THE POSTPARTUM PERIOD

Although physical violence during pregnancy is well recognized as a public health problem, there is little information available on the prevalence and duration of violence among adolescent mothers. Harrykissoon and colleagues interviewed 570 adolescents within 48 hours of delivery and followed them for up to 24 months' post partum. One in 5 adolescent mothers reported being victims of violence by 3 months' post partum, and three quarters of mothers who had been abused prior to delivery were also abused after the birth of the child. All women should be routinely screened for intimate partner violence during pregnancy, as well as after the birth of the child.

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CONCURRENT SERIOUS BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN 2396 INFANTS AND CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED WITH RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

Prior studies have indicated that many infants hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus infections are prescribed a regimen of antibiotics, especially those who have abnormalities on chest radiograph. A review of nearly 2400 infants and children admitted to one hospital during 7 respiratory seasons found that 70.5% had begun receiving antibiotics on admission. There were no positive blood cultures for pathogens, and positive urine cultures were found in 1.1%. Concurrent serious bacterial infection is rare in infants hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus, and empiric antibiotic treatment is not indicated.

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ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN HEALTH RISK BEHAVIORS AND OPPOSITE-, SAME-, AND BOTH-SEX SEXUAL PARTNERS IN REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLES OF VERMONT AND MASSACHUSETTS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Sexual minority youth are known to face a disproportionate number of health risks compared with their heterosexual peers. In a population-based sample of more than 22 000 high school students, both-sex students had a 3- to 6-fold greater risk than opposite-sex students of being threatened or injured with a weapon, making a suicide attempt, using cocaine, or using risky means to control their weight. School- and community-based interventions should be considered to prevent and reduce these health risks among adolescents who have sex with both males and females.

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PROSPECTIVE IDENTIFICATION AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH PEDIATRIC AUTOIMMUNE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH GROUP A STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION (PANDAS)

The possible association of streptococcal infections with the sudden onset of neuropsychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, tics, and chorea has been described in psychiatric referral populations. In this primary care, practice-based study, Murphy and Pichichero describe 12 school-aged children who had a greater than 3-year period with the sudden onset of severe obsessive-compulsive behaviors accompanied by signs of acute group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis. Antibiotics seemed to be effective in treating the neuropsychiatric symptoms. The prevalence of this is more common than other nonsuppurative complications of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal infection.

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DOES SOCCER BALL HEADING CAUSE RETINAL BLEEDING?

Increasing attention is being paid to the potential health consequences of soccer players repeatedly heading the ball. Reed and colleagues studied 21 soccer players aged 13 to 16 years. These players averaged 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks. None of the players had retinal hemorrhages. Examination of the biomechanical forces in 7 children while heading the ball found linear cranial accelerations of 3.7g, while rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers seem unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage despite the considerable linear forces sustained.

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