0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Special Feature |

Pathological Case of the Month FREE

Gregg T. Lueder, MD; Richard Grosten, MD; Morton Smith, MD
[+] Author Affiliations

Section Editor: Enid Gilbert-barness, MD


Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001;155(4):519-520. doi:10.1001/archpedi.155.4.519.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

THE RIGHT eye of an otherwise healthy 6-year-old girl was red for several months without pain. She had neither a history of ocular trauma nor family history of iritis, glaucoma, or ocular tumors. On examination, visual acuity was 20/50 OD and 20/20 OS. Intraocular pressure was 44 mm Hg OD (reference, <20 mm Hg). The conjunctiva was diffusely hyperemic. The patient had circulating cells in the anterior chamber and layered cells inferiorly (Figure 1). Computed tomography revealed calcification in the retina. Results of a serum Toxocara canis titer were 1:16. Examination under anesthesia revealed flaky and noncohesive white cells in the anterior chamber. In the recumbent position, the cells dispersed onto the anterior lens capsule and zonules. A large, white, elevated lesion was present in the peripheral retina with 2 creamy, elevated retinal nodules posteriorly (Figure 2). The right eye was enucleated and examined (Figure 3 and Figure 4).

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Cutaneous malignant melanoma metastatic to the vitreous. Arch Ophthalmol 1986;104(1):98-101.
Glaucoma in retinoblastoma. Semin Ophthalmol 2005 Oct-Dec;20(4):217-22.