0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001;155(11):1192. doi:10-1001/pubs.Pediatr Adolesc Med.-ISSN-1072-4710-155-11-ptm1101.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

LIMITS OF THE GENETIC REVOLUTION

Medical and lay publications give increasing, and sometimes overwhelming, coverage of genetic discoveries. Concrete progress in therapy, however, has been and will likely continue to be slow. Dr Scheuerle discusses the molecular, economic, and behavioral barriers to the development of genetic treatments. The economic disincentives to develop orphan drugs may hinder therapy for truly rare diseases. The lack of uniform compliance with existing effective therapies will limit the adoption of new treatments. While the genetic revolution had much potential, the complexity of genetics itself is great. Advancements will be made, but they are likely to occur only at a measured pace.

See Article

FOSTER CARE PLACEMENT IMPROVES CHILDREN'S FUNCTIONING

More than 500 000 children are currently in foster care in the United States, and the average stay in care is 33 months. There have been limited data on the effect of foster care on children's health and functioning. In this prospective, longitudinal study of 120 children in foster care, Horwitz and colleagues examined the improvement in children's functioning at 6 and 12 months after placement. After 12 months of care, children's functioning significantly improved, with mean scores well within the range of normal. Children who were older at placement and spent more time in care were the group most likely to show improvement. The results argue for a careful examination of the foster care environment to better understand the factors that most contribute to improved functioning.

See Article

THE INFLUENCE OF GRANDMOTHERS AND OTHER SENIOR CAREGIVERS ON SLEEP POSITION USED BY AFRICAN AMERICAN INFANTS

In the United States, rates of sudden infant death syndrome continue to be higher in African American infants. This is potentially related to a higher rate of prone sleeping in these infants. Flick and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial among pregnant women and their mothers during the third trimester, during which education about sleep position was given. Including grandmothers in the education did not increase the rate of supine sleeping postnatally, though it did decrease the amount that the grandmothers worried about sudden infant death syndrome. It is clear that the Back-to-Sleep campaign must include all caregivers for the child.

See Article

EFFECTS OF 2 INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS ON GROWTH: RESULTS OF A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

While inhaled corticosteroids are widely recommended for the treatment of asthma, little is known about the effects of different inhaled steroids on growth rates. This randomized controlled trial compared twice-daily fluticasone proprionate with beclomethasone diproprionate in 4- to 11-year-old children during a 12-month period. The adjusted mean growth velocity in the fluticasone group was significantly higher than in the beclomethasone group. The fluticasone group also had greater improvement in lung function. The more favorable risk-benefit ratio for fluticasone that indicates that it may be preferable for the long-term treatment of children with asthma.

See Article

OVERRESTRICTION OF DIETARY FAT INTAKE BEFORE FORMAL NUTRITIONAL COUNSELING IN CHILDREN WITH HYPERLIPIDEMIA

Previous reports have suggested that parent-imposed low-fat diets in the absence of nutritional counseling may have a negative effect on the growth and development of children. In this study of children referred by their primary care pediatricians for hyperlipidemia, parent-imposed diets resulted in lower energy intake and lower fat intake than the diets of control children. These children had lower vitamin E and zinc intake as well. The study indicates that overzealous dietary fat restriction can occur in parent-initiated diets.

See Article

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.