0
Article |

Impact of Specific Medical Interventions in Early Childhood on Increasing the Prevalence of Later Intellectual Disability

Jeffrey P. Brosco, MD, PhD; Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH; Monica Dowling, PhD; Ghislaine Guez, MD, MBA
JAMA Pediatr. 2013;167(6):544-548. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.1379.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Importance For the past 100 years, medicine in industrialized nations has become increasingly focused on specific medical interventions designed to improve the health of individual patients. Substantial evidence suggests that broader improvements in public health, nutrition, and economic well-being are more salient than medical or surgical interventions for the remarkable decrease in infant and child deaths since 1900. Less is known about the impact of specific medical interventions on morbidity such as intellectual disability (ID).

Objective To explore the impact of medical interventions in early childhood on increasing the prevalence of later ID, as reported in the literature from 1950 through 2000.

Design We reviewed the medical literature and other data from 1950 through 2000 to construct estimates of the condition-specific prevalence of ID over time. We further explored the existing literature to document historically relevant influences on condition-specific prevalence, including the introduction of effective interventions, the timing of these introductions, and the likelihood of their widespread use.

Setting Twentieth century United States and Western Europe.

Participants Populations of children who received a life-saving intervention within the first 5 years of life and were evaluated for ID after 5 years of age.

Main Outcome Measures Case-specific prevalence of ID from 1950 through 2000.

Results Low birth weight is associated with approximately 10% to 15% of the total prevalence of ID. No other new medical therapies introduced during this period were associated with a clinically significant increase in ID prevalence.

Conclusions and Relevance Previous research has shown that specific medical interventions, such as newborn screening for congenital thyroid deficiency and phenylketonuria, have decreased the prevalence of ID approximately 16% in the United States since 1950. These results suggest that other medical interventions, particularly the advent of intensive care technologies, have also increased the prevalence of ID.

Sign In to Access Full Content

Don't have Access?

Register and get free email Table of Contents alerts, saved searches, PowerPoint downloads, CME quizzes, and more

Subscribe for full-text access to content from 1998 forward and a host of useful features

Activate your current subscription (AMA members and current subscribers)

Purchase Online Access to this article for 24 hours

Figures

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Sign In to Access Full Content

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Topics
PubMed Articles
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();