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Special Feature |

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case FREE

Kiera L. Goff, BS; Rachel H. Gormley, MD; Patrick J. McMahon, MD; Adam I. Rubin, MD; Leslie Castelo-Soccio, MD, PhD
[+] Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia (Ms Goff); Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania (Drs Gormley and Rubin); and Section of Dermatology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Drs McMahon and Castelo-Soccio), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


SECTION EDITOR: SAMIR S. SHAH, MD, MSCE


Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(12):1177. doi:10.1001/2013.jamapediatrics.220.
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A 20-year-old African American woman presented to the pediatric dermatology department for evaluation of a widespread itchy rash involving the trunk and extremities, with acral accentuation, sparing the face. The rash had progressively worsened during the previous 1.5 weeks.

Physical examination revealed a healthy-appearing young woman with widespread pink targetoid papules on the palms and soles of the feet but also extending to the trunk (Figure 1). The patient reported being sexually active up until 3 months prior with a single male partner. She had no history of herpes virus infection or other sexually transmitted infections.

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Figure 1. Photograph of the left medial foot of the patient depicting the targetoid appearance of widespread papules and plaques.

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Figure 1. Photograph of the left medial foot of the patient depicting the targetoid appearance of widespread papules and plaques.

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