0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(11):989. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.559.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

PHYSIOLOGIC MONITORING PRACTICES DURING PEDIATRIC PROCEDURAL SEDATION: A REPORT FROM THE PEDIATRIC SEDATION RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

A prospective, observational study by Langhan et alArticle found a large degree of variability in the use of physiologic monitoring modalities for pediatric procedural sedation.

THE LONG-TERM OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC PLEURAL EMPYEMA: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

Although a large proportion of children continued to exhibit signs and symptoms of pleural empyema in the month following hospital discharge, Cohen et alArticle found that in most cases, resolution occurred within 12 months.

PHYSIOLOGIC RESPONSES AND ENERGY EXPENDITURE OF KINECT ACTIVE VIDEO GAME PLAY IN SCHOOLCHILDREN

Smallwood et alArticle found that using Kinect for the Xbox 360 produced higher heart rate, oxygen uptake, and energy expenditure compared with rest and sedentary game play. This equated to an increased energy expenditure of up to 172 kcal · h–1 compared with traditional sedentary video game play.

FOOD CONSUMPTION AND SCREEN-BASED SEDENTARY BEHAVIORS IN EUROPEAN ADOLESCENTS: THE HELENA STUDY

Using data from the HELENA study, Santaliestra-Pasías et alArticle found that increased television viewing and computer and Internet use during adolescence was associated with higher odds of consumption of sweetened beverages and lower odds of fruit consumption.

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTENSITY AND CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK IN YOUTH

Only vigorous physical activity was consistently associated with lower levels of waist circumference, body mass index z score, systolic blood pressure, and increased cardiorespiratory fitness in youth, Hay et alArticle found.

OBESITY, METABOLIC SYNDROME, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN URBAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OF MINORITY RACE/ETHNICITY

Turchiano et alArticle compared the point prevalences of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components using 2 definitions of MetS. An elevated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was much more sensitive than an impaired fasting glucose threshold in identifying metabolic dysregulation.

ASSOCIATION BETWEEN INTENSIVE HANDWASHING PROMOTION AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT IN KARACHI, PAKISTAN: A CLUSTER RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Bowen et alArticle found that children randomized to the handwashing promotion during their first 30 months of age attained global developmental quotients 0.4 SDs greater than those of control children at 5 to 7 years of age.

FOUR-YEAR-OLD OUTCOMES OF A UNIVERSAL INFANT-TODDLER SHARED READING INTERVENTION

Goldfeld et alArticle found that the Let's Read program provided neither the anticipated benefits to literacy and language nor enhanced uptake of literacy activities at 4 years of age.

LETTING CHILDREN SIP: UNDERSTANDING WHY PARENTS ALLOW ALCOHOL USE BY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL–AGED CHILDREN

The belief among mothers that allowing children to sip alcohol can have protective consequences for children ranged from approximately 15% to almost 40%, Jackson et alArticle found, noting also a strong association between parental prosipping beliefs and children's reported alcohol use.

BULLYING INVOLVEMENT AND AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF BULLYING INVOLVEMENT AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH AN AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

Among adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder, Sterzing et alArticle found the prevalence rates of bullying involvement for adolescents were 46.3% for victimization, 14.8% for perpetration, and 8.9% for victimization/perpetration.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.