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This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(10):888. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.554.
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EFFECT OF EARLY EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON YOUNGER SIBLINGS

In the follow-up to the randomized trial of the Infant Health and Development Program, McCormick et alArticle found there was no evidence of benefit at adolescence for the younger siblings of participants in the intervention group compared with the siblings of those in the control group.

SUCKING IMPROVEMENT FOLLOWING BLOOD TRANSFUSION FOR ANEMIA OF PREMATURITY

Bromiker et alArticle found that correction of anemia of prematurity with blood transfusion improved sucking and volume ingested in premature infants who were previously poor feeders.

INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC POSTDIARRHEAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME: FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH IDENTIFYING SHIGA TOXIN–PRODUCING ESCHERICHIA COLI

In this national study of postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) by Mody et alArticle, early stool collection for E coli O157 culture and Shiga toxin testing increased detection of Shiga toxin–producing E coli strains causing HUS.

COSTS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF NEONATAL MALE CIRCUMCISION

Kacker et alArticle used Monte Carlo simulations tracking men and women during their lifetimes and 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to evaluate lifetime direct medical cost and prevalence of male circumcision–reduced infections.

TELEVISION VIEWING AND EXTERNALIZING PROBLEMS IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN: THE GENERATION R STUDY

Verlinden et alArticle found that young children's continued exposure to television increases their risk for new externalizing problems.

SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS IN PRESCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN: OPPORTUNITIES FOR PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION

In a clinical sample, Brown et alArticle found 1 in 4 low-income preschool-aged children screened positive for social-emotional problems.

URBAN LATINO CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS AND PERFORMANCE IN INTERACTIVE DANCE VIDEO GAMES: EFFECTS OF GOAL DIFFICULTY AND GOAL SPECIFICITY

Gao and PodlogArticle found that children's performance and activity levels in a dance program were higher when given specific performance goals.

USING PAY FOR PERFORMANCE TO IMPROVE TREATMENT IMPLEMENTATION FOR ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS: RESULTS FROM A CLUSTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL

To test whether pay for performance (P4P) is effective in improving adolescent substance use disorder treatment implementation, Garner et alArticle assigned 29 community-based organizations to an implementation-as-usual control condition or a P4P condition. Patients in the P4P sites were 5-fold more likely to receive the appropriate treatment.

COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF PREVENTIVE ORAL HEALTH CARE IN MEDICAL OFFICES FOR YOUNG MEDICAID ENROLLEES

Stearns et alArticle estimated the cost-effectiveness of a medical office–based preventive oral health program called Into the Mouths of Babes. Repeat oral health visits in medical offices reduced hospitalizations and office visits for dental caries–related treatment.

EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT

MeekerArticle provides a review of common endocrine disrupting chemicals, an overview of adverse effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on child development, and recommendations for future research.

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