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This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(8):692. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.544.
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PROSPECTIVE MULTICENTER STUDY OF VIRAL ETIOLOGY AND HOSPITAL LENGTH OF STAY IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE BRONCHIOLITIS

Mansbach et alArticle found that while human rhinovirus infection alone was associated with a shorter length of stay, coinfection with respiratory synctial virus was associated with longer hospital stays.

FREQUENCY OF PARENT-SUPERVISED OUTDOOR PLAY OF US PRESCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

Half of preschool-aged children in a nationally representative sample were not being taken outside to play daily by their parents, Tandon et alArticle found. For children who do not have a regular child care arrangement besides their parents, 42% did not go outside daily.

ORGANIZED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN YOUNG SCHOOL CHILDREN AND SUBSEQUENT 4-YEAR CHANGE IN BODY MASS INDEX

In a study of 4550 children by Dunton et alArticle, body mass index increased 0.05 unit/year slower for children who participated in outdoor organized sports at least twice per week compared with children who did not.

ROLE OF WAIST MEASURES IN CHARACTERIZING THE LIPID AND BLOOD PRESSURE ASSESSMENT OF ADOLESCENTS CLASSIFIED BY BODY MASS INDEX

Khoury et alArticle found that increased weight to height ratio was associated with worsened lipid profile and increased odds of hypertension both relative to subjects with both normal body mass index and normal weight to height ratio.

PRESENTATIONS AND OUTCOMES OF CHILDREN WITH INTRAVENTRICULAR HEMORRHAGES AFTER BLUNT HEAD TRAUMA

Among 15 907 patients evaluated with computed tomography, Lichenstein et alArticle reported that children with nonisolated intraventricular hemorrhages after blunt head trauma typically had Glasgow Coma Scale scores of less than 14, frequently required neurosurgery, and had high mortality rates.

CRANIAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY USE AMONG CHILDREN WITH MINOR BLUNT HEAD TRAUMA

In a study of 42 412 children younger than 18 years seen within 24 hours of minor blunt head trauma, Natale et alArticle found that 34.7% underwent head computed tomography.

VALIDATION AND REFINEMENT OF A PREDICTION RULE TO IDENTIFY CHILDREN AT LOW RISK FOR ACUTE APPENDICITIS

Kharbanda et alArticle validated a prediction rule for acute appendicitis that identified patients at low risk with (1) an absolute neutrophil count of 6.75 × 103/μL or less and no maximal tenderness in the right lower quadrant or (2) an absolute neutrophil count of 6.75 × 103/μL or less with maximal tenderness in the right lower quadrant but no abdominal pain with walking/jumping or coughing.

PATTERNS OF CARE AT END OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH ADVANCED HEART DISEASE

Most pediatric deaths associated with advanced heart disease occurred in the first year of life after a prolonged hospital stay, according to Morell et alArticle.

THE PARENTING RESPONSIBILITY AND EMOTIONAL PREPAREDNESS (PREP) SCREENING TOOL: A 3-ITEM SCREEN THAT IDENTIFIES TEEN MOTHERS AT HIGH RISK FOR NONOPTIMAL PARENTING

Lanzi et alArticle reported that a 3-item screening tool identified adolescent mothers with elevated depressive symptoms and childhood trauma and lower scores of knowledge of infant development.

ADOLESCENT BARIATRIC SURGERY

In a review, Hsia et alArticle discussed the epidemiology of pediatric obesity, the common surgical procedures used for weight loss, and the importance of multidisciplinary management.

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