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This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine |

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine FREE

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(7):591. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.539.
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VITAMIN D, CALCIUM, AND DAIRY INTAKES AND STRESS FRACTURES AMONG FEMALE ADOLESCENTS

Sonneville et alArticle found that vitamin D intake was associated with lower stress fracture risk among adolescent girls who engage in high levels of high-impact activity. Neither calcium intake or dairy intake was prospectively associated with stress fracture risk.

EFFECT OF CHOLECALCIFEROL AS ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY WITH INSULIN ON PROTECTIVE IMMUNOLOGIC PROFILE AND DECLINE OF RESIDUAL Β-CELL FUNCTION IN NEW-ONSET TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

Cholecalciferol used as adjunctive therapy with insulin is associated with a protective immunologic effect and slower decline of residual β-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, Gabbay et alArticle found.

REMOVAL OF BOVINE INSULIN FROM COW'S MILK FORMULA AND EARLY INITIATION OF BETA-CELL AUTOIMMUNITY IN THE FINDIA PILOT STUDY

Vaarala et alArticle found that weaning to a whey-based cow's milk formula free of bovine insulin reduced the early induction of beta-cell autoimmunity during the first 3 years of life compared with conventional formula.

RELIABLE CHANGE IN POSTCONCUSSIVE SYMPTOMS AND ITS FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES AMONG CHILDREN WITH MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Many children with mild traumatic brain injury show reliable increases in postconcussive symptoms associated with significant declines in health-related quality of life and an increased likelihood of educational intervention 12 months after injury, Yeates et alArticle found.

RETINAL HEMORRHAGES IN CHILDREN: THE ROLE OF INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

In the absence of the few readily recognizable alternate scenarios, Shiau and LevinArticle found that extensive retinal hemorrhage in very young children is not secondary to isolated elevated intracranial pressure.

SUGARING THE PILL: ETHICS AND UNCERTAINTIES IN THE USE OF SUCROSE FOR NEWBORN INFANTS

Wilkinson et alArticle review recently published data that cast doubt on the analgesic properties of sucrose in newborn infants and analyze the philosophical and ethical questions that they raise.

PROGNOSTIC UTILITY OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY

Cheong et alArticle found that magnetic resonance image abnormalities in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and basal ganglia and thalami demonstrate the greatest predictive value for long-term outcome in moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

VARIATION IN INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING AND OUTCOMES IN PEDIATRIC TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

Across 36 children's hospitals, Bennett et alArticle found there was significant variation in intracranial pressure monitoring. Hospitals that monitor intracranial pressure more frequently and those with higher patient volumes had better patient outcomes.

HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND INFANTILE COLIC

Of 55 patients with infantile colic, AliArticle found that 45 (81.8%) tested positive for Helicobacter pylori ; of the 30 healthy control subjects, 7 (23.3%) tested positive for it.

SAFETY EFFECTS OF DRAWSTRING REQUIREMENTS FOR CHILDREN'S UPPER OUTERWEAR GARMENTS

Rodgers and ToppingArticle found that the requirements of the voluntary standard for drawstrings were highly effective, resulting in a 90.9% reduction in the drawstring-related mortality rate among children younger than 14 years.

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