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PROGRESS IN PEDIATRICS |

DISTURBANCES OF NUTRITION OF THE ARTIFICIALLY FED INFANT WITH PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF THE CLASSIFICATION OF FINKELSTEIN

JULIUS H. HESS, M.D.
Am J Dis Child. 1911;II(6):422-450. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1911.04100120055005.
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Directions for making, recently obtained from the Kinder-Asyl diet kitchen, are as follows: To 1 quart of raw milk add 1 tablespoonful of essence of pepsin (elixir rennet, junket tablets, dessertspoonful of pegnin or chymogen) and stir for one-half minute. The mixture of milk and ferment is now kept at 100 to 107 F. and perfectly quiet for about fifteen minutes, when the clot is formed. The free whey is now poured off and the remaining curd is put into a thin muslin bag, or one made of four layers of gauze (if too thick it drips too slowly or vice versa, curds will pass through and some of the curd is lost), and left to drip for one hour. The curd is now placed in a fine hair sieve and rubbed through with a potato masher, adding buttermilk, one pint, to facilitate this process. The passing through the sieve should be repeated until the curd is minutely divided. Now, as a final process, water to make a total mixture of 1 quart and 1 per cent, of malt-sugar are added. This is now put into a receptacle resembling a small ice-cream freezer and put on the stove to boil for ten minutes. While boiling, the handle is vigorously turned, stirring the milk inside thoroughly and constantly (stirring with an egg-beater if the above is not obtainable will answer; the former is to be recommended as it also prevents evaporation. I find that stirring with a spoon does not cause agitation enough to prevent large curd formation.) Churning is continuously kept up for two reasons: 1. To make the curd finer.
To get the suspension more homogeneous. After ten minutes of boiling, the kettle is placed in a bath of cold water to cool it off, still turning the crank for a few minutes until the milk is cool. Then it is put into bottles. Overheating for feeding ruins the product; 100 F. does not change it. [Note: With all due courtesy to the author we wish to state that the first method of preparation was adopted in our diet kitchen, because of the indefiniteness of the details in its preparation as first published and the consequent difficulties encountered in attempting to get a fine curd.] for thirty to thirty-five minutes. It is now put aside for fifteen minutes, then the excess of whey is poured off and the remaining curd is put into a thin muslin bag, or one made of four layers of gauze (if too thick, it drips too slowly, or if vice versa, curds will pass through and some of the curd is lost), and left to drip for two hours. The curd is now placed in a fine hair sieve, any further free whey drained off and then rubbed through with a potato masher, adding buttermilk 1 pint to facilitate this process. (The buttermilk used is made from whole milk heated to 180 F. for forty minutes, then cooled to 80 F. The scartaline is now added, and after standing from eighteen to twenty hours at the latter temperature it is churned to remove the butter-fat.) The passing through the sieve should be repeated until the curd is minutely divided. Now, as a final process, boiled water to 1 quart is added, and 1 per cent. of malt sugar is added. Sohxlet's Nährzucker is used for my cases, although Mellin's food or Horlick's malt food answers the purpose. Therefore, the finished product contains the curd from 1 quart of boiled milk and 1 pint of boiled buttermilk, 1 pint of boiled water, and 1 per cent, malt sugar.
Moro's Carrot Soup.—One pound carrots are peeled, sliced and cooked one to two hours, and after mashing, poured through a sieve and mixed with the bouillon made from a pound of beef and 1 liter water. To the latter add one teaspoonful of salt.

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